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Cold Ironing: The role of ports in reducing shipping emissions

26.03.2019

With the shipping industry entering a new, environmentally-friendly period, stakeholders in the maritime industry are seeking for ways to reduce their ships’ emissions. Apart from choosing green fuels and scrubbers, ports come to add another solution: Cold Ironing. This is the process of providing shoreside electrical power to a ship at berth, while its main and auxiliary engines are turned off.

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Italy Signs on for Chinese “Belt and Road” Port Investments

22.03.2019

Italy's government is headed squarely for a deal with China on direct investment in as many as four major seaports, explicitly endorsing Beijing's "belt and road" economic development program.

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ICS released the latest Flag State Performance Table

21.03.2019

The International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) published the latest update of its Flag State Performance Table. In the report, ICS analyzes how the administrations performed, by providing an annual overview of the world’s ship registers against a number of criteria.

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Lloyd’s Register: Preparing for the maritime cyber security challenge in Greece

20.03.2019

Imagine you are an Information Security Manager for a shipping company and while docked in port, a service technician boards your ship to perform a software update of the Voyage Data Recorder system and unknowingly introduces a virus.

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ExxonMobil sees marine fuel expansion in light of IMO’s 2020 deadline

19.03.2019

As the world is preparing for IMO's 2020 sulphur cap fuel regulation, oil major ExxonMobil’s marine fuels outfit is innovating to be at the forefront of the emerging low sulphur market, as Forbes reports. The oil major sees the sulphur regulations as an opportunity and not as an operational problem.

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IMO 2020 Full Sail Ahead: Incoming Waves for Refiners, Shipowners

15.03.2019

As of January 1, 2020, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) will begin enforcing a new regulation that caps the allowable sulfur content of all marine fuels from its current level of 3.5% m/m (mass/mass) to 0.5% m/m. While this new limit will not change the lower limits in existing sulfur Emission Control Areas (ECAs), it will inevitably have wide-ranging implications on oil refiners and the shipping industry, as well as force significant changes in the demands for certain bunker fuels.

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